The Lodger – A Story of the London Fog (1927)

Hello Creeps. I apologize that my Friday Night horror film review is taking place on this Saturday morning. I completely lost track of the days. Today I would like to discuss one of my personal Hitchcock favorites: The Lodger – A Story of the London Fog. This film is one of his silent films from 1927, and is one of the few that didn’t end up lost. Let’s sum up the story line: News has spread that there is a killer on the loose who is killing women with blonde hair. A man asks for a room at what I assume is an inn or apartment building. The mother of the daughter begins to question if the man is in fact the serial killer.

The film starts out with a police men talking to a distressed woman. They find a piece of paper with the words “The Avenger” on it. I felt this opening made you feel like you were part of the movie. We find out that the Avenger is a Tall man with his face wrapped up. That is the only description that could be made about the serial killer The Avenger. He favored to kill women with beauty and golden hair. It’s quite apparent that The Avenger is like a Jack the Ripper who favored to mutilate prostitutes.
What I enjoy most about this film is the fact that it feels like you are part of it. It feels like you are someone walking down the street listening to the paper boy scream about the recent news. It feels like you’re in the car with the police officers driving through the streets. It feels like you are at the apartment building living with the family and worrying about who could be next.
This film mixes horror, comedy, and romance all into one in a great manner. For example, the daughter of the landlady is a fashion model with golden hair. To keep safe from The Avenger she wears a hat the covers the rest of her hair but has dark curls at the front end to make it look like she’s a dark haired woman.
When we get to the apartment building, we meet the mother, father, and the lover of the daughter. The lover of the daughter is a detective who goes on the search for The Avenger within the film. When the lodger comes to ask for a room, he immediately begins to stare at the daughter. At first, you start to believe that he finds her to be a very beautiful woman and she has captured his interest.
The daughter and the lodger become good friends and she doesn’t think it will cause any harm done by being friends. Her family and her lover don’t approve of the friendship since the Lodger is nothing but a mere stranger.
I enjoy the fact that this film can mix your emotions towards everyone in the film. There isn’t a moment where you aren’t actually thinking about each character in the film. Since it’s silent, the actors and actresses portray the emotion very well. It comes out of the screen and into your body to flow within. Unlike many silent films of the time, the body language of the people in the film isn’t over acted. Their reactions are more realistic as to what the reactions would be if we were all there in real life.

If you’d like to get lost within this Hitchcock film I found the full movie here:

If you do check out the film, please feel free to comment back and share with me your thoughts. I’d be interested in hearing them.

Blood & Guts,
Mercy Desdemona.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “The Lodger – A Story of the London Fog (1927)

  1. First off I would like to say great blog! I had a quick
    question which I’d like to ask if you don’t mind.
    I was interested to know how you center yourself and clear your head before writing.
    I have had a hard time clearing my mind in getting my ideas out there.
    I truly do enjoy writing but it just seems like the first 10 to 15 minutes tend to be wasted just trying to figure out how to begin.
    Any ideas or tips? Cheers!

    • Thank you!

      Well – I talk to myself. I talk to myself with my ideas out and about until it lights a little fire in me.

      I also take the time to concentrate on things that I love. It’s flows better in my opinion.

      Music is also a big help! I tend to listen to film music when I’m reviewing a film or songs from the decade the film was released. If I’m writing an original I use Bach, Beethoven, Chopin..etc.

      A brainstorming notebook may help too πŸ™‚

      Hope that helps πŸ™‚

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s